Further professional testing of the drinking water at Optus Stadium and the surrounding Stadium Park undertaken on Sunday has conclusively confirmed it is safe to drink.

  • Professional sampling and testing undertaken on Sunday again confirms lead levels in Optus Stadium and Stadium Park drinking water are well below the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines maximum acceptable concentration guideline for lead.
  • This testing is in addition to those undertaken prior to Technical Completion and on Friday 16 February 2018, which were also fully compliant.
  • The testing shows conclusively that the water at Optus Stadium is fine to drink, a fact that was confirmed by the Department of Health after reviewing the results overnight.

The water samples were collected in accordance with relevant sampling, testing and plumbing standards and guidelines and examined by an accredited laboratory.

The test results for lead concentrations ranged from 0.002mg/L to 0.006mg/L, all well below the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines (ADWG) maximum acceptable concentration guideline for lead of 0.010mg/L. 

Further, when comparing test results to the guideline value, it is important to note that the ADWG guideline for lead is based on lifetime exposure, and assumes exposure levels for a two-year-old child. 

The test results and our investigations further conclude that the testing undertaken by The Sunday Times was in absence of the strict standards and quality controls that apply under the Australian Standard for water quality sampling, AS 5667.5; for example, using the correct sampling technique and correct sample bottles, properly treated and handled to ensure no risk of cross-contamination. 

In addition to the water testing undertaken yesterday, the drinking water system at Optus Stadium and the surrounding Stadium Park was also professionally tested and commissioned prior to Technical Completion in November 2017 with additional sampling and testing of the potable water undertaken on Friday, 16 February 2018.

A flushing regime remains in place to ensure fresh water flows within the potable water system to maintain water quality.